keepitsurreal
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likeafieldmouse:

Getty Images
Flamingos taking refuge in a bathroom at Miami-Metro Zoo, Sept. 14, 1999, as tropical-storm force winds from Hurricane Floyd approached the Miami area.
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A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.



Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.
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wandrlust:

The Guggenheim, Almost Empty, c. 1959 — Ezra Stoller
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Entering Sigmund Freud’s study, which has been preserved in his former Hampstead home, one is not sure whether one has entered a psychoanalyst’s office, or a Victorian opium den. The oriental décor, antiquities, and Egyptian steles suggest something more than just a casual inquiry into working processes of human psyche. Freud’s study is anything but the sterile environment of a scientist. This place gleams with a decadent glamour and the walls could tell one too many stories of Freud’s patients’ most private and scandalous thoughts. In this dream like space, which seems to be so far from everyday reality, one is immediately drawn to lie down on the infamous couch veiled in Persian tapestries, and confess the darkest of secrets. 
However the piece of furniture that is somewhat more captivating than the couch itself, is Freud’s slightly grotesque leather armchair. Its






design is an uncannily close match with some of the primitive idols resting on Freud’s desk. Apparently the chair was specially designed for Freud by the architect Felix Augenfeld to allow him to read in his favorite and rather peculiar position - one of his legs slung over the arm of the chair, the book held high and his head unsupported. Thus this object of my curiosity is perhaps merely a utilitarian piece of furniture, designed in order to provide comfort during its owner’s reading. On the other hand, it is possible that as such this chair, being a kind of an imprint of Freud’s unique body posture, becomes almost a surrogate for Freud himself.  With its bizarre, human-like form, this chair more than anything else in this room haunts the study with Freud’s eternal presence.
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François Morellet - Adhésifs éphémères (1968)
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Richard Artschwager, Corner, 1991-92
From the Indianapolis Museum of Art:

The unusual location for Richard Artschwager’s sculpture Corner can serve to take the viewer by surprise. Bolted to the corner of a wall, this sculpture is suspended in a somewhat interstitial space of the gallery, rather than a more predictable position on the wall or floor. A sense of compression is conveyed in the bending shape of three stick-like forms, imparting a feeling that the corner of the room itself is somehow bearing pressure on this piece. Although this is simply an illusionary effect, it nevertheless succeeds in making viewers aware of the space around them in a new way by making space itself seem palpable. As Artschwager has described, his work proposes that sculpture can be “felt space.”
Corner expresses Arthschwager’s unique approach to sculpture, which is largely dominated by his desire to seek out unusual and unexpected materials and forms. He is particularly well-known for his use of Formica, a material that has been commonly used in building construction since the 60s, but is seen as a debased and resolutely non-art material. Here, he intentionally complicates the modernist ideal of purity of materials by employing painted wood as well as Formica. While the striated pattern appears to be natural oak wood-grain, upon closer inspection it becomes clear that this is an imitation of that natural form made in Formica. The artist deliberately emphasizes such ambiguity, and points to the fact that this often overlooked material of Formica offers a form of representation in its imitation of wood.
In its placement and materials, Arthschwager’s sculpture calls attention to its own forms of representation and how it functions in space. It also makes sly allusions to some of Pablo Picasso’s famous challenges to artistic convention in the early 20th century, including his early sculptural constructions and his use of imitation wood-grain in his Cubist collages.
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Giovanni Bellini, St. Francis in Estacsy. c. 1480